Us Jordan Trade Agreement

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Us Jordan Trade Agreement

The agreement also contains trade-related environmental and labour provisions. These provisions do not oblige either country to adopt new labour or environmental laws and each country reserves the right to set its own labour and environmental standards and to amend these standards. Under the agreement, the two countries reaffirm the importance of not abandoning or deviating from their labour or environmental laws to promote trade and commit to effectively enforce their national labour and environmental laws. In 2006, the National Labor Committee, a US non-governmental organization, published a series of reports on Jordanian sweatshops whose conditions, according to the executive director of the CNPC, were « the worst »: 20-hour workdays, months of non-payment and physical abuse. Most of the workers are not Jordanian; They are contract migrant workers from countries like Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and China, who pay a lump sum of about $2,000 to $3,000 to be hired by a garment factory. However, some factories then confiscate their passports and subject them de facto to involuntary servitude that borders on human trafficking. [8] Many members of Congress expressed concern, not least because the Jordanian Free Trade Agreement was hailed as « historic and progressive, » because it « incorporated labour and environmental provisions directly into the agreement instead of being in an ancillary agreement. » [1] At the last meeting of the Joint Committee, in May 2016, the United States and Jordan discussed labour, agriculture, in particular current technical barriers to agricultural trade, the adoption of the World Trade Organization (WTO) Trade Facilitation Agreement and accession to the WTO Agreement on Government Procurement. The parties opened a dialogue to outline concrete measures to promote trade and investment bilaterally, as well as between Jordan and other countries in the Middle East. Following the meetings, the issue of the import certificate for poultry from the United States was resolved in order to allow the importation of American poultry into Jordan. Poultry imports worth $8 million were exported to Jordan in 2017. The Jordanian Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) entered into force on 17 December 2001.

Under the agreement, virtually all Jordanian products arrive duty-free in the United States. The Jordanian Free Trade Agreement does NOT provide for exemption from the Goods Processing Tax (MPF). Jordan became a « magnet for clothing manufacturing » when U.S. companies like Wal-Mart, Target, and Hanes set up factories to cut costs by removing tariffs. . . .

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